Meet the UW-Rock Community

Advisor Sara Koch

Sara Juarez Koch

UW-Rock County Advisor

"As a UW-Rock County student, I really got to know people. Some of my professors even came to my wedding and I am still friends with classmates I met here -- that's why I was excited to come back here to work," says Sara Juarez Koch.

Koch started out as a UW-Platteville student after high school, but found that it wasn't a good fit for her at the time. After taking a break for a year and working, she enrolled at UW-Rock County after a friend recommended it. Soon, she was enjoying her classes, meeting new people and recommending the campus to her friends, one of which later became her husband.

She was involved in the Multicultural Student Union on the campus and enjoyed taking classes from such professors as George Jones, Robert Storch and the late Julia Hornbostel. She ended up earning not just her Associate of Arts and Science degree, but also an English Department award at her graduation ceremony.

Koch transferred to UW-Whitewater after graduation and earned a bachelor's degree in Spanish with a minor in teaching English as a second language to adults. She worked at Blackhawk Technical College and the Job Center before landing a position at UW-Rock County Student Affairs as an advisor in 2003. She's been helping students one-on-one to meet their educational goals  since then. Some of her advice to students comes from her own experiences as a student here.

"Go to your classes," she tells students often. "That's how you get to know your professors and how they get to know you. It's a small school, so when you don't show up, they notice. But, remember, your instructors are people, too. Don't be afraid to get to know them and to ask for help when you need it."

In December, Koch earned a Master of Science in Education in adult education with an emphasis in counseling from UW-Platteville. She's already found that this education has enhanced her work as an advisor. "I'm more aware of different issues that can affect students and know what I can help them with, such as study skills and relationship or anxiety issues, and when I need to refer a student to other resources, such as the mental health counseling we have on campus."   

 

UW-Rock County Student, Frank Martinez

Frank Martinez

UW-Rock County Student

"What I love about literature is that there are so many ways for everyone to connect with the text. My Count of Monte Cristo could be completely different from your Count of Monte Cristo; it’s that sort of subjective relationship that I love to discuss with others," says University of Wisconsin-Rock County student Francisco “Frank” Martinez of Evansville.

Martinez was selected by Sigma Kappa Delta, the national English honor society for two-year colleges, to present at their annual convention that will be held February 26-March 1, 2014, in Savannah, Georgia. He was chosen from 26 students who applied and will be part of a four-person panel discussing “Against the Current: Life-changing Literature.” 

Martinez is a member of the Delta Gamma chapter of Sigma Kappa Delta, the UW-Rock County chapter advised by John Pruitt, UW-Rock County Associate Professor of English. Students are invited to apply for membership to Sigma Kappa Delta if they have completed at least two college courses in English language or literature and have at least a B average in English and general scholarship.  

“The judges were very impressed with the submissions from students around the country and it is an honor to be chosen to present at the national conference,” says Pruitt. “This is a great opportunity for Frank to share with other students his thoughts on books that have changed his life and also to meet some authors, read their work and interact with them.”

Assistant Professor, Zac Curtis

Zac Curtis

Assistant Professor of Communications & Theatre Arts

"Put yourself out there and try the things that scare you. It’s the best way to grow," advises Zac Curtis, who was recently named an Arthur M. Kaplan award winner for his innovative improvements in instruction to UW-Rock County students.

Curtis was honored for his ability and willingness to provide students with the confidence and techniques needed to overcome their fears and make their ideas heard through both his public speaking and theatre courses. In his Introduction to Public Speaking course, Curtis pushes his students’ comfort levels by having them speak both in the intimate classroom environment, and in a large theatre venue. Students comment that he pushed them to be better speakers while creating a comfortable and fun environment.

In his Introduction to Theatre Course, Curits has developed a project based on the Federal Theatre Project’s Newspaper Theatre in which students work throughout the semester to create, write, design and act a play based on current event headlines, with a goal of creating theatre that promotes social change.

Curtis was also honored for broadening theatre education and bringing entertainment to the larger Rock County community by co-writing and directing the original play On a Turtle’s Back: The Legend of Urashima Taro, which was performed on the campus last November.

Curtis has a bachelor’s degree in theatre and communications from Colorado State University, a master’s degree in theatre production from Central Washington University and a master of fine arts degree in directing from the University of Idaho. He joined the UW-Rock County faculty in 2012 and lives in Janesville with his wife and two children.

Todd Levine

Lecturer of Biological Sciences

"Do you care about our future?  Are you frustrated with politics that overwhelm data?  Do you feel like you just can't get the inside scoop on science?  Yeah.  We get that.  And that is what our trip is all about.  My name is Todd Levine and I am working with a small group of students to help them to see the world and to get involved in something bigger than any of us."

UW-Rock County lecturer of biology Dr. Todd Levine will lead a study abroad course this summer to the edge of the arctic and the ocean in Canada’s Churchill, Manitoba, to study climate change.

The course, Biology 298 Polar Bears to Plankton: On the Frontiers of Climate Change, will provide an opportunity for students to see some of the greatest megafauna in the world, such as polar bears, whales, and more while learning about one of the most ominous and controversial issues of our time: global warming. The trip will depart August 10 and return on August 18. 

“We all need to understand science. None of us can be a responsible citizen without at least a basic understanding of science. No science, no data can tell us what we should do.  But, science can tell us what we must do to achieve certain outcomes. We have to decide whether the data are convincing. We have to decide what it is worth to ensure particular futures. That's what students will learn on this trip,” says Levine. “I will challenge those who believe in climate change to examine why and will challenge students who don't believe in climate change to explain why not. We will move beyond politics and beliefs; we will see what all the fuss is about and shape our own opinions.”

Levine has worked in science for more than a decade. He earned bachelor's degrees in biology and political science from the University of Missouri-St. Louis and his doctorate from Miami University. His wife, Dr. Kerri Wrinn, is a UW-Rock County assistant professor of biology.

“Much of my own research is not about climate change, but is framed by it.  So, I have a responsibility to not believe in climate change, but to critically examine the data and understand the whys and wherefores, too,” says Levine.

Shekinah McBride, UW-Rock County Student

Shekinah McBride

UW-Rock County Student

"I believe the three best things about UW-Rock County are they offer classes that gear you up for your career, they encourage you to try your best in all of your classes and to not give up, and they offer tutors that will help you improve in the subjects that are most challenging," says student Shekinah McBride.

McBride transferred from UW-Parkside to UW-Rock County last spring. She’s interested in pursuing a career in medicine and has enjoyed her classes, especially learning math from Dr. Robert Hein. When she’s not in classes she also has a student job on campus and serves as a student ambassador, giving tours and helping with events.

"The environment at UW-Rock County inspires and encourages the students who attend there to set, focus and achieve their goals," she says. “At UW-Rock, you will learn the skills in time management and the ability to put your priorities in perspective."

Associate Professor, Erin Ellison

Erin Ellison

Associate Lecturer of English

"I think that it's important to acknowledge our students' previous knowledge of, and experience with, technology when designing curriculum; for many incoming students, incorporating new technologies into the writing process makes that process exciting and relevant," says UW-Rock County lecturer of English Erin Ellison.

Ellison recently received an Arthur M. Kaplan Award, which recognizes innovative improvements in instruction or service to students by UW Colleges faculty and academic staff. Ellison was recognized for her dedication to providing a new format for a remedial composition course for students to help them prosper in all courses requiring a writing component. Students in Ellison’s English 099 course benefit from intimate, four-student sessions and the innovative use of digital technology as they learned the writing and revision process.

"When I started teaching composition, I noticed that many of my students wanted to use their phones or computers in class. That observation inspired me to harness that energy in a positive way," explains Ellison. "I started introducing writing-relevant iPad and iPhone apps, and teaching technology-driven writing strategies that would help students catalogue their ideas both inside and outside of the classroom."

For example, students aren't always excited to brainstorm ideas in their notebooks, according to Ellison, but, given the opportunity to document those same ideas in an app like iBrainstorm, the mood and productivity in the classroom changes dramatically.

"I think that as composition instructors, it's important that we not only produce students who are clear and effective writers, but students who are technology literate and know how to use technology in productive, professional ways," says Ellison.

Ellison has a bachelor’s degree in English from UW-Madison and a master’s degree in English and Irish literature from Boston College. She’s been an instructor at UW-Rock County since 2012. She and her husband live in Madison where she plays in the Irish folk band Rising Gael.